Special Meet & Greet with Trainer Dr. Ian Dunbar to Benefit Purr’n Pooch Foundation for Animals

Meet & Greet with Dr. Ian Dunbar to Benefit Purr’n Pooch Foundation(left: Dr. Ian Dunbar; right: Dick Palazzo with Jax)

Mark your calendar for April 24, 2014, 7-9 p.m.  A very special evening event is planned to benefit the Purr’n Pooch Foundation for Animals. We are happy to offer a Meet and Greet with Dr. Ian Dunbar, pioneer in dog behavior training. He will be presenting a full day seminar earlier in the day from 9:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. entitled “Simple Solutions for Common Dog Behavior & Training Problems” at the Purr’n Pooch Tinton Falls location. He will be available during the evening reception to answer questions and offer advice.

“Foundation grants are awarded once a year,” said Betsy Palazzo, Foundation President. “The criteria for application are that you submit on behalf of a 501(3)(c) nonprofit organization and state the reason for funding. We research every organization who applies, and we try to accommodate everyone who is qualified. We awarded 12 grants in 2013.”

The maximum grant to any one organization per year is $5,000. The same organization can apply year after year.

“Annually, we have granted $30K, and for a small, all volunteer foundation, we are very proud. Every penny helps,” said Betsy.

The opportunity to talk with Dr. Ian Dunbar personally will be a special treat for event attendees.

“Dr. Dunbar’s philosophy of socialization as it applies to dogs and animals is something that we both have in common,” said Dick Palazzo.  “I respect him and believe he is one of the foremost lecturers in the country right now, and I am very proud to have him present at Purr’n Pooch. Dr. Dunbar and I are honored to talk with guests about their individual dog behavior problems during the reception for charity.”

Purr’n Pooch Pet Resorts has created one of the finest dog socialization programs in the country. We not only help dogs that are doing things wrong, we are able to advance dogs that are doing things right – an area where most trainers fall short.

“Socialization builds communication with animals, and we do it with love, fun and challenging games,” said Dick Palazzo, President & CEO, Purr’n Pooch.

Purr’n Pooch has become trend-setters for taking dogs to higher levels through elevated mental and emotional stimulation. We have perfected dog daycare; not only can a dog come to play, but a dog can graduate into higher level play groups that are more challenging. The dog is mentally and emotionally stimulated in a way that keeps the dog truly engaged. The outcome is that the pet becomes a better dog.

“Our accomplishment with our dogs is through understanding by love and patience. Once you have that, you earn trust. Once you have trust, you have a secure pet who is willing to do whatever you want and ask him to do. That is definitely a philosophy that I share with Dr. Dunbar,” continued Palazzo.

You can register for the event now for a donation of $25. >

The Purr’n Pooch Foundation for Animals was established in 2010 by the Palazzo sisters as a way to celebrate a 40 year milestone for Purr’n Pooch Pet Resorts.

“Our parents had always taken in and rehabilitated rescued dogs,” said Betsy Palazzo. “They did this out of the goodness of their own hearts, never asking for any monetary assistance or anything in return. We decided what better way to honor what they have done, and to honor all the unsung heroes in the animal rescue world, than by creating a foundation that helps all types of animals in need.”

Dick Palazzo made a habit over the years of visiting shelters and taking on certain dogs destined for euthanization because they were unable to be rehabilitated by the shelter. Read about his success stories with dogs Grace and Mac on the Foundation website, both misdiagnosed with aggressive tendencies who later became perfect house pets. Mac was even featured in Dog Fancy magazine for his incredible heroism when he saved his family, including two children, from a fire a year ago. Read the story here. Jax, a pit bull from Hoboken, is also a success story, having been rescued and rehabilitated by Betsy Palazzo. Today, Jax visits local schoolchildren in efforts to end breed stereotypes and raise awareness of the importance of pet adoption.

What Dick Palazzo has learned through his rehabilitation work is that most animals deemed “aggressive” are not so much aggressive as they are insecure. Rebuilding trust is a key component in the animal’s rehabilitation process.

The foundation awards grants for any type of animal rescue including dogs, cats, exotics, horses and wildlife.

Their fundraising efforts have helped many organizations including Project Animal Worldwide who specializes in Sato dog rescue in Puerto Rico; the US War Dog Association, which received assistance with a care package drive targeting Military dogs in the Middle East; and Marine Mammal Stranding Center, whose facility was adversely affected by Superstorm Sandy.

Join the Palazzos, Dr. Ian Dunbar and friends of the Purr’n Pooch Foundation for Animals on this special evening of celebration, education and fundraising. Your donation will help a charity in need and change the life of a suffering animal.

Purr’n Pooch To Host One-Day Seminar with Dr. Ian Dunbar – Pioneer in Dog Behavior Training

Purr'n Pooch To Host One-Day Seminar with Dr. Ian Dunbar

Purr’n Pooch is excited and honored to have Dr. Ian Dunbar present “Simple Solutions for Common Dog Behavior & Training Problems” to community dog owners and trainers. The seminar is scheduled for Thursday, April 24, from 9:30am – 5:30pm at the Tinton Falls location.

There will also be an evening reception at 7 p.m. to benefit the Purr’n Pooch Foundation for Animals‘ grantees. You won’t want to miss this special occasion.

Dr. Dunbar is the pioneer in dog behavior training. Growing up on a farm with a variety of animals ranging from cows and chickens to dogs and cats, he was encouraged by his family to become a veterinarian.

He was also greatly influenced by his grandfather whom he observed using a tactic little used back then of luring the farm  animals to get them to do what he wanted, rather than pushing, prodding and roping. The animals were rewarded by petting and with food, and this reward-based philosophy was later played out in Dr. Dunbar’s studies and his own dog training seminars and lectures.

“I read lots of studies while in vet school and academia about the effects of early environmental enrichment and socialization on puppies,” said Dr. Dunbar.  “What I learned is that the dog’s brain actually degenerates in as little as three weeks’ time with the lack of proper socialization. The animal can actually suffer permanent brain damage.”

After being invited to give public lectures through the University Extension, Dr. Dunbar found the experience so rewarding after a time that he chose to educate the public full time.

“The public was so eager to learn simple basic techniques of reward-based training and puppy socialization, I decided to make it my life’s work,” continued Dr. Dunbar.  “Puppies are fun and easy to teach.  The key is to start the process as early as possible by introducing the puppy to many different people and rewarding the dog for the desired behavior. If the dog is denied proper socialization until six months of age, for example, you’ve lost the opportunity and the dog may never grow to be the happy, well-adjusted and well-behaved dog he could have been.”

Dr. Dunbar suggests when you get a new puppy, plan to have regular parties at your home for the first month.

“Introduce your puppy to as many new people as possible,” said Dr. Dunbar. “Let your puppy learn naturally not to fear strangers, children or men in particular.”

The credits under Dr. Dunbar’s name are numerous and include:

  • Producing the first ever Puppy Training Video, which helped make his reward-based training technique spread easily and quickly throughout the world
  • Founding the Association for Professional Dog Trainers, which is now the world’s largest association of its kind and the only one offering certification to both US and International members
  • Founding OpenPaw.org which helps Animal Shelters set up a dog socialization and behavior training program

Whether a pet parent or pet professional, you won’t want to miss this amazing opportunity to learn from the most highly regarded dog trainer and behaviorist in the world. Expect to learn how to deal with these common canine issues:

  • House soiling
  • destructive chewing,
  • excessive barking
  • digging
  • home-alone problems (and separation anxiety)
  • hyperactivity
  •  jumping-up
  • not coming when called
  • pulling on leash
  • leash reactivity to other dogs
  • lack of attention and compliance

This seminar has been approved for 6 CEUs by the CCPDT & IAABC. Register early here for a fee of $90. Separate registration required for the Q&A and evening reception event.

7 Tips for a Positive and Successful Dog Training Experience

7 Tips for a Positive and Successful Dog Training Experience

Our pets rely on us to feed and bath them, give them comfort and direction, provide them with stimulation and socialization, and to protect them from harm. So why do some pet owners skip hiring a professional dog trainer?

Training plays an important role in helping us to become responsible dog owners. It makes it possible for us to entertain our dogs with tricks and games; introduce them to other dogs and people; live a less anxious and worried life; and to avoid self-harm. It’s tail-wagging time that training becomes a top priority when buying or adopting a dog. Let’s “paws” for a few training candidate scenarios.

Big dog, big problems? Do you walk down the street with your 100+ dog jumping and pulling both of you into dangerous situations? You’ve had many close calls as your dog drags you steps from the street and speeding cars.

Chewie on the loose? Maybe you’re the proud parent of a new puppy and find his excessive chewing not only draining on your wallet, but also on your nerves. You live in constant fear that your new cutie has eaten something dangerous or even lethal.

Too old to train? Maybe you believe your old dog can’t learn new tricks? Well, you’ll want to read about Mac, a rescue dog Purr’n Pooch’s President Dick Palazzo trained to love and trust again. Last year, this arthritic senior walked up a flight of stairs to save his family from a fire. Read his miraculous story on our blog and in the upcoming April issue of Dog Fancy magazine.

One of these stories may be familiar to you or you may have your own “tail” of woe to share. Let’s focus, however, on the positive and enroll your dog in training classes in 2014. A New Year means a new opportunity to learn to communicate more effectively by understanding what motivates certain behaviors, how to read canine body language, and more. There are some simple things you can keep in mind to ensure that you and your dog have a positive and successful training experience.

7 Tips for a Positive and Successful Dog Training Experience:

1. Consider your dog’s environment. Hire a trainer based on what works for you. Group and private classes at home and at training centers are widely available. For what to look for in a dog trainer, visit the Association of Professional Dog Trainers and consider Purr’n Pooch’s team as an option.

2. Customize your training according to dog’s age and ability. Do not set your dog up for failure with a cookie cutter training experience. Like people, every dog has had a different set of life experiences that come through in its behaviors.

3.  Be consistent. Have everyone in the household on the same page even the children. If everyone teaches the dog the behaviors in the same way, they are more likely to learn faster.

4. Reward positive behavior. When your dog does what you want, praise him verbally and in the beginning give him a treat.  Make a big deal about the positive and ignore bad behavior. Pets are like children, any sort of reaction could be mistrued as a reward.

5. Make it fun. Let’s face it if we aren’t having fun doing something we are likely to give up and move on.  Join a training class with your furry best friend and hang out with other people who share the same experiences of dog life.

6. Build a lifelong bond. By training with your dog on a regular basis and making it a fun and rewarding experience, you’ll build a bond with your dog that will last a lifetime.

7.  Dog’s point of view.  At Purr’n Pooch we always say to look at your life from your dog’s point of view and only then will they have an understanding of us.

Training at Purr’n Pooch

Group training for puppies and adolescents are held at the Purr’n Pooch training hall at 86 Gilbert Street West in Tinton Falls, NJ. For more information on private training information or with any questions, place call 732-842-4949 or email info@purrnpooch.com.

Wishing you and your dog a stress-free 2014 enjoying all the things you love to do together from walks on the beach to socializing with new friends at the dog park. With some training and time, you’ll be ready to showoff your dog’s good behavior and hard work in no time.

 

HARLEY’S ON GOOD BEHAVIOR WITH POSITIVE TRAINING AT PURR’N POOCH

“Firm, but gentle. Demanding, but passionate. Sincere…”

If we were asked to describe Iuliana, the trainer we selected for our 11 month, work-in-progress, rescue named Harley, then these are the first thoughts that come to mind.

We were very fortunate to have a friend recommend Dick Palazzo, owner of Purr’n Pooch as a contact for someone to train our boxer “beast”. After describing Harley to him, he said “I have just the right trainer for you. Her name is Iuliana”. We spent our first hour at Purr’n Pooch in an upstairs training area with Harley and Iuli. We were horrified at how ill-mannered he was. Yet Iuli just stayed totally calm. She showed us how to discourage his aggressive behavior staying tranquil and rewarding him for doing well. Never once did she try to restrain him or raise her voice. We just sat there with our mouths agape. (Maybe there is hope).

Fast forward two months…he’s still a work-in-progress, but is so much more obedient. Iuli comes to our house and works with him – again reinforcing the positive with encouragement and treats. As we all agree, he’s very smart. He remembers commands. He keeps eye contact when training. But he’s still young and headstrong. But we’re sure he’s going to be a very special guy.

After each session Iuli send us summary reports and further training suggestions.
We will continue to work with Iuli and strongly recommend her skills and demeanor as a trainer extraordinaire.

Ellen and Jay Garfunkle
Oceanport, NJ