Stray Kitten Home for the Holidays

Stray Kitten Home for the HolidaysLisa Scotppetuolo, pet technician at Purr’n Pooch Pet Resorts in Tinton Falls, NJ, discussed the idea with her boyfriend of adopting a cat for months. She was just waiting for the “right” time. But one little miracle kitten had plans of her own for winning over Lisa and going home for the holidays.

The playful, cocoa brown and gray kitten was only a few months old when Purr’n Pooch Foundation for Animals’ Committee Member Ellen Garfunkle found her limping and unable to get around as easily as the other cats in a neighborhood colony. Ellen knew life would be short for any kitty trying to survive in the wild this winter in good health, never mind this little one with special needs.

Ellen scooped up the kitten and brought her to Purr’n Pooch’s Dick Palazzo for guidance. Dick had found a helping hand in Dr. Rachel Gordon of South Branch Veterinary Services who started to help treat the kitten’s medical condition.

Following treatment, Dick fostered the cat and soon everyone at Purr’n Pooch had fallen in love with her. After spending only a few days caring for and playing with the kitten, Lisa knew she was a great fit for her home and this December she became a permanent member of Scotppetuolo family.

Lisa recently discovered that Twinkie loves tricks (and treats). Just in time for holiday entertaining, too!

She trained Twinkie with many of the same techniques used in Purr’n Pooch’s dog training classes. Nothing stops her now as she works with her mom on tricks like sit, twirl, lie down, high five and give kisses. See Twinkie do her tricks in this YouTube video. We can’t wait to see her continued progress and who knows maybe Twinkie will be YouTube’s next celebrity cat!

Twinkie has defied the odds and will spend the holiday home, warm and loved, with her new family snug as a bug in a Christmas stocking.

Unlike Twinkie, many feral and stray cats won’t survive the winter without medical care, food and shelter. Special individuals like Ellen Garfunkle and Purr’n Pooch Foundation for Animals’ grantees like All Fur Rescue and Cat Assistance Network care for cat colonies and run trap-neuter-return programs that are key to combatting cat over-population.

The Purr’n Pooch Foundation for Animals awards annual grants to non-profit, no-kill animal and marine mammal rescue and welfare organizations to be used for day-to-day operations, emergency relief, spay/neuter efforts, veterinary care, equipment, construction, vehicle purchases, educational programs and special projects. Learn more about our grant recipients. >

The Foundation raises funds for our grantees through special events organized for all ages, people and pets. Events include our canine run/walk, dog-friendly gala, summer party and collection drives. One of our highly-anticipated events is the Foundation Grantee Breakfast, where unsung heroes from the charities we fund join us for a morning of friendship and celebration as we present them with their grants.

Please consider making a donation to the Purr’n Pooch Foundation for Animals and make a difference in the lives of feral and stray cats today by supporting the work of our grantees.

For resources on outdoor cats check out these links:

Humane Society: Learn about the outdoor cats—community (feral and stray) and owned cats—you see outside in your community

Alley Cat Allies: Colony Care Guide 

Volunteer for All Fur Love Rescue

Debunking Myths in Pet Care: “Kennel Cough”

Blog-Post-Kennel-Cough

Post by Dick Palazzo, President, Purr’n Pooch Pet Resorts 
Family Owned & Operated Since 1970

There is perhaps no more misunderstood canine disease than what is commonly referred to as “kennel cough” or canine cough. In medical terms, it’s a contagious respiratory disease among dogs, typified by inflammation of the trachea and bronchi. Canine cough, when put in simple terms, is the dog equivalent to the human cold.

It is spread by any one of three infectious agents (parainfluenza, adenovirus or Bordetella). Because of the continued use of the name “kennel cough”, it is widely misunderstood as something dogs inherently catch in a kennel or pet boarding facility. In fact, many veterinarians and WebMD continue to call the virus “kennel cough” often leading anxious pet owners down the wrong path when trying to understand where their dog may have contracted the virus.

I challenge all of us in the pet care industry and veterinary medicine to use the medical term Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease (CIRD), instead of  “kennel cough” because it’s important that dog owners and the public in general be educated on the respiratory disease and its origins.

Canine cough is also an accurate name for CIRD because it describes the syndrome of coughing dogs but does not imply that the disease is caused by a pet care facility. By labeling canine cough “kennel cough”, employees in our industry are constantly working to educate others on the disease. It’s an ongoing issue we face and is very similar to those that were once faced by childcare facilities. Schools and daycares have been successful in educating parents on how illness spreads and today you’ll find hand sanitizer everywhere from the playground to the doctor’s office. But for us, the professionals in the pet care industry, the label “kennel cough” continues to mislead pet owners on the origins of the virus.

What are the symptoms of Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease (CIRD)?

CIRD can show up as a dry, hacking cough and is followed by a ratching or gagging sound. An infected dog may also exhibit a runny nose and sneezing. This disease prognosis without treatment can develop into a fever and breathing problems. For these reasons, early detection on the part of the owner or anyone caring for the pet is important. In general, the incubation period for CIRD is anywhere from 3-10 days and there are millions of strands of the virus.

Why did Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease come to be called “kennel cough”?

While attending pre-veterinary school in the 1970s, I remember reading in medical textbooks that the discovery of kennel cough could be traced back to a time when laboratories, kennels and breeding facilities were boarding dogs in common areas. This started it all and today people are still associating the “kennel cough” with kennels and pet boarding facilities simply because of the name.

How is CIRD contracted?

Typically CIRD is spread from dog to dog in secretion of the eyes, nose, or mouth and by direct contact from infected dog to healthy dog. Sneezing or coughing releases tiny aerosolized droplets carrying the virus to over 20 feet in any direction and spreading ITB to healthy dogs. Viruses can also be carried on hands, clothing, shoes, pet supplies and equipment. It’s crucial to have a healthy facility that creates happy, healthy pets and pet daycare and boarding facilities are leading the pack in taking the precautions necessary to stop the spread of a virus like CIRD.

Much of the literature on “kennel cough” says it has to do with the quality of ventilation when large amount of pets are housed together. Although that is true, the main reason is socialization. Many people take their pets out of the house and bring them to public places such as dog parks, restaurants, hospitals and pet stores. Basically, we live in a more dog-friendly world (thankfully) and our pets socialize more with one another, and thus are more likely to contract the virus.

Most of the time, healthy dogs will pick up the infection through scent because this is the way dogs communicate. You’ll notice the first thing a dog will do when out is drop its head to the ground and sniff around. Dogs can also catch CIRD through the air, as it is an airborne infection. Fortunately, with proper ventilation and by taking precautions like having your dog vaccinated you can lessen your pet’s chances of contracting CIRD. It is also important that when visiting your veterinary office, you inquire about the precautions they take to safeguard your pet’s health while in the waiting room and throughout the building in general.

What precautions are taken at Purr’n Pooch to maintain healthy pets?

At Purr’n Pooch Pet Resorts, the same mechanical contractors that designed and installed Jersey Shore Medical Center’s ventilation system also recently designed our units. It’s rare to find a facility with this ventilation system because many buildings are just not designed for it. Everything we do at Purr’n Pooch is for the comfort and care of our pets and their health and safety from the air systems to our hygienic cleaning.

It is possible that no one will ever get to the bottom of discovering exactly how and where our pets contract this infection. Many of us with children can also relate as we prepare for cold and flu season! Your children will spend more time with friends and classmates socializing indoors and on the playground and sports fields. A cold is inevitable and unfortunately so are those visits to the doctor’s office and many do not have state-of-the-art ventilation systems.

I’ve been working with dogs and cats for more than 45 years and it saddens me to hear the term kennel cough used more often than CIRD or canine cough. My hope is that this will change because as soon as pets are treated and the infection is labeled “kennel cough,” it’s sometimes directed back to the dog’s favorite home away from home – the boarding facility, daycare and grooming salon/spa.

My advice for pet owners is to educate yourself and if you believe your pet has CIRD, please visit your veterinarian for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Please note that all the information provided on the Purr’n Pooch Pet Resorts blog is for educational and entertainment purposes only. Please contact your veterinarian for an evaluation before diagnosing or treating your dog.

 

Purr’n Pooch Foundation Lends a Paw to Animal Charities in Need

Purr'n Pooch Foundation Lends a Paw to Animal Charities in Need

Purr’n Pooch Foundation recently awarded grants to 11 non-profit animal welfare organizations. The organizations will use the grants for day-to-day operations, emergency relief, spay/neuter efforts, veterinary care, equipment, construction, vehicle purchases, educational programs and special projects.

The 2013 grantees are MidAtlantic Bulldog Rescue, New Life Boxer Rescue, German Shorthaired Point Rescue, Marine Mammal Stranding Center, All Fur Love Animal Rescue, Project Animal Worldwide, Wag On Inn Rescue, Tabby’s Place: A Cat Sanctuary, Operation Kindness, Greyhound Friends of New Jersey and the Monmouth County SPCA.

Without the help of grants and donations, these organizations would not be able to continue rescuing animals, caring for them and finding them forever homes with loving families. Here are just a few stories from the organizations we’ve been able to lend a paw.

MIDATLANTIC BULLDOG RESCUE

MidAtlantic Bulldog Rescue (MABR) is an NJ non-profit organization with experienced volunteers on a mission to help bulldogs in need. MidAtlantic Bulldog Rescue volunteers provide a safe and loving home for bulldogs in transition. Mick is just one of the many bulldogs from MABR who found a forever home. Here is his story.

Mick, a 5 year old male bulldog, was in a shelter in Philadelphia for over one year while legal charges against his owner were being processed. Mick was seized along with a female bulldog Bea and several other breeds of dogs. The Philadelphia SPCA was able to adopt out Bea to a family, as she only required a spay. When the SPCA called and asked if MABR would take Mick into its rescue, they informed them that he needed extensive medical care the shelter was unable to give him.

At his first vet visit they planned to neuter him, have his nasal passages widened and have his tail amputated. Cathy Kittell of MidAtlantic Bulldog Rescue received a call from Dr. Schull at Richmond Valley Vet informing her that Mick had a mass on his spleen. The decision was made to perform a splenectomy and biopsy the mass. Dr. Schull was able to neuter him at the time of surgery.

The biopsy came back clean, and two weeks later Mick had surgery for tail amputation, nasal passages and upper and lower double entropion surgery. Mick also has deep calcification in both of his ears (he is mostly deaf) and has a double luxating patella. He also has limited vision from the years of his eyes being untreated. The foster family has managed to control his ear condition and he will see an orthopedic specialist in the future. With the help of grants and donations, MABR was able to afford medical care for Mick.

Mick was adopted on June 24, to the family that adopted Bea. MABR was able to reunite Bea and Mick, who had not been together since March of 2013. They did remember each other as Cathy was told they slept side by side their first night together.

On June 19, MABR filmed a segment on News12 NJ’s “The Pet Stop” with show host and Purr’n Pooch Foundation for Animals’ Trustee Dr. Brian Voynick. Mick was the star of the show and a hit with the host and viewers  Here he is, happy and healthy mugging it up for the camera.

NEW LIFE BOXER RESCUE

New Life Boxer Rescue is a non-profit organization which spans over the northeast region of the United States. Its foster homes are spread out across the country. The organization is dedicated to the preservation and enhancement of the lives of Boxers who are at risk of being neglected, abused or forced to find new homes for reasons not in their control. Dupree, a very special dog, is just one of the many boxers who found love and care at New Life Boxer Rescue. He hasn’t found his forever home yet, but is currently being loved and cared for by his foster mom Patricia of New Life Boxer Rescue. Here is his story.

Dupree came into New Life Boxer Rescue blind. He is a loving, sweet boy. As a special needs boxer, his chances were not good for finding his forever home. After numerous visits to the vets, they found out that Dupree could possibly be a candidate to have his sight restored. Dupree was operated on at Pittsburgh Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Center (PVSEC) and the doctor was able to save his sight in one eye. His second eye was too far gone and was subsequently surgically removed. New Life Boxer Rescue had to raise over $4000 for his surgery.

Dupree pulled through with flying colors. Ellen Garfunkle of New Life Boxer Rescue said, “We hope he will eventually find his special family that will love him as much as we do.”

GERMAN SHORTHAIRED POINTER RESCUE

German Shorthaired Pointer Rescue (GSP Rescue) is a network of dedicated volunteers who have the capacity to love their breed beyond the regard they hold for their own personal dogs. Rescue dogs come from shelters and pounds, from which they must be pulled, given health care, reconditioned or trained and placed. An unwanted dog may also come directly from a home where circumstances have changed. In these cases, the organization helps the family find an appropriate new home for the dog. Here are a just two stories of special pups rescued by GSP Rescue.

Mr. G (which stands for Ganado) was loved very much by his adopted parents Michelle and Dino. He was just shy of 15 when he passed in his mother Michelle’s arms this year. In his lifetime he traveled to many states far and wide including Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, California, Texas, Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and Delaware. Mr. G’s mom Michelle intends to turn his adventures into a book. Dino and Michelle are active GSP Rescue of NJ volunteers because of Mr. G.

Henry was surrendered by his owner who no longer had time for him before he was rescued by GSP Rescue. He now lives happily with his adoptive parents Melanie and Daniel.

MARINE MAMMAL STRANDING CENTER

With the assistance of grants and donations, the Marine Mammal Stranding Center is able to continue to help rescue, rehabilitate, release and preserve marine mammals and sea turtles.

To apply for a Purr’n Pooch Foundation for Animals grant visit www.purrnpoochfoundation.org

 

LEND A PAW AND PARTY FOR A PURPOSE AT
THE 5TH ANNUAL SUMMER GALA

JULY 23 ~ 6:00 – 10:00 P.M.

To support the Foundation’s work, please join us on Wednesday, July 23, 2014 from 6:00 -10:00 p.m. for our 5th Annual Summer Gala at Shrewsbury Sailing and Yacht Club, 512 Seawaneka Avenue in Oceanport,NJ. The evening will raise lifesaving funds to support the efforts of nonprofit, no-kill animal rescue organizations.The night features beautiful sunset views on the Shrewsbury River, live music, 50/50 cash drawings, silent auctions, a delicious menu by the Lusty Lobster, wine and beer by Vic Rallo and 90 + Cellars, decadent desserts, coffee station by Court Liquors and Rook Coffee  music, dancing and more.

Learn more and purchase tickets online now. >

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR SUMMER GALA SPONSORS

Purr'n Pooch Foundation Lends a Paw to Animal Charities in Need

4 Questions to Ask When Choosing a Dog Daycare

4 Questions to Ask When Choosing a Dog Daycare
I’ve enjoyed working with dogs and cats for more than 40 years at Purr’n Pooch Pet Resorts in Tinton Falls and Wall, NJ. Our family-owned and operated facilities are run by an extraordinary team of 70 pet care professionals, many of whom have been with us for more than 30 years.

Although dog daycares weren’t popular until the 1990s, it was during the early 1970s when I invested my time and love for pets into our Tinton Falls and Wall facilities. I would open the doors to allow our boarding dogs to enjoy leash-free, group play in the halls and yards. Animal behavior was a young science then, and many colleagues questioned why I would take such huge risks with the animals. Today, I am proud to see that dog daycare has become a service widely accessible across the country.

Dog daycare continues to be on the rise. Many families work long hours and don’t want their dogs to be home alone. Some simply want their dogs to socialize and enjoy a good time. There are many reasons people bring their dogs to daycare, but the common thread among our clients is the love they share for their pets and their desire to do what’s best for them.

At Purr’n Pooch, we offer 45 different play areas, transitional groups, and even programs for pets with special needs. By having these spaces and specialized services, our dogs can play and enjoy themselves in the proper, supervised environments.

Pet owners should understand however that not only do the accommodations matter when leaving a pet with a daycare facility, but staff experience is key to successful socialization and a happy visit.

It’s important that you inquire about the credentials of the establishment before leaving your dog in its care. A pet care professional with many years of experience assessing animal behavior should evaluate the potential daycare client. Always ask if the employee evaluating your pet has the proper credentials to diagnose your companion’s behavior. Some questions to ask include:

 

1. Will you evaluate my dog’s personality as well as its breed and size?

The personality, behavior and size of your dog should all be evlauated, not just your dog’s breed and size. Like children, dogs have their own individual personalities and tend to gravitate to certain people and dogs during the socialization process. Knowing more about your dog will make it possible for the daycare to place it in a group that works best for its temperament.

2. Will my dog be supervised at all times?

Your pet’s caregiver needs to instill boundaries and supervise situations when your dog is at play in any group setting. Be sure to inquire about daycare security and supervision, as they are equally important factors when choosing a facility.

3. Will my dog play in a group right away?

Your dog should be introduced slowly to its new environment, comfortably introducing a circle of friends and becoming familiar with the surroundings on his or her own time. Some dogs require more time than others to develop the confidence necessary to socialize in groups. This type of introduction takes patience, understanding, and, above all, an investment in employee training and workplace safety practices. And, many dogs may benefit more by being placed in a daycare with human versus dog contact. This environment will exist at a facility willing to work with your pet.

4. What type of surface will my dog play on?

In my professional opinion, the safest and most hygenic surface is astro turf developed specifically for canines. Digging in the dirt, jumping in muddy puddles, and roaming through the grass are all favorite pup pastimes, but your dog’s daycare facility should make sure that your pets still enjoy themselves without potential health hazards. The fuss of daily baths and pesticides could irritate a pet’s skin and fleas, ticks and bacteria can lurk in grass and dirt. At Purr’n Pooch, we outfit our play areas with environmentally friendly turf, which has a knitted backing that provides immediate drainage, so any liquid will wash away automatically, and its soft surface is durable yet gives our guests a comfortable, safe and clean experience while playing outdoors.

No two pets are alike and I take pride in celebrating their uniqueness. Why set dogs up to fail with a daycare that is not accurately assessing their needs or providing the ideal environment for play from the very start? Visit us in Wall or Tinton Falls to see if daycare is a fit for your best friend.

 

Support U.S. Military Working Dog Teams this Season of Giving

Support U.S. Military Working Dog Teams this Season of Giving

This holiday Purr’n Pooch Pet Resorts at both locations in Wall and Tinton Falls are collecting donations for U.S. Military Working Dog Teams who have been deployed to the Middle East. We need your help in supplying them with gifts.

The Purr’n Pooch Foundation for Animals will host a volunteer working day on Saturday, January 18, 2014 at 2 p.m. at 86 West Gilbert Street in Tinton Falls, NJ. The general public and Foundation supporters are invited to write letters to the dog handlers and prepare their care packages for shipment. If interested in volunteering or for more information, email info@purrnpooch.com.

Visit the United States War Dogs Association for ways to help the organization throughout the year. Operation Military Care K-9 is one of its many wonderful projects. Also be sure to visit the organization’s US War Dog Memorial. Dedicated on June 10, 2006, the Memorial, located guarding the gateway to the New Jersey Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial in Holmdel, New Jersey, consists of a bronze statue of a kneeling Vietnam War soldier and his dog, set on a black granite base.  The memorial was designed by sculptor Bruce Lindsay. The U.S. War Dogs Memorial, while directly representing the War Dog Teams of the Vietnam War, honors all our nation’s war dogs and their handlers – past, present and future.

Purr’n Pooch will be collecting the following items for Operation Military Care K-9:

K-9 PRODUCTS

  • K-9 Warming Mats
  • K-9 Boots, Medium & Large
  • K-9 Doggles
  • Collapsible Nylon Dog Bowls
  • Kong 3” Rubber Balls
  • Large Rope Chews
  • K-9 Shampoo & Conditioner
  • K-9 Grooming Tools-Combs, Brushes, etc.
  • K-9 Nail Clippers
  • K-9 Beds or Sleeping Mats
  • K-9 Blankets
  • K-9 Toothpaste & Toothbrush
  • K-9 Eye Drops
  • K-9 Ear Wash
  • K-9 Advantix, Flea and Tic Treatment
  • K-9 Salves for paws/noses
  • Towels to wipe paws
  • True Chews Chicken Jerky
  • True Chews Beef Bully Sticks
  • K-9 Treats

FOOD AND SNACKS FOR THE HANDLERS

  • Coffee / Tea / Hot Cocoa
  • Sugar & Creamers
  • Condiments-Hot Sauce, Ketchup, etc
  • Lemonade Mix, Ice Tea Mix, Crystal Light
  • Powdered Gatorade
  • Instant Foods / Oatmeal /Grits / Ragu Express/ Kraft Easy Mac
  • Crackers and Cheese
  • Power Bars
  • Dried Fruit
  • Microwave Popcorn
  • Bubble Gum / Hard Candy
  • Instant Soup
  • Tuna / Small Canned Foods
  • Chex Mix / Chips in Container / No Bags
  • Fruit Cups
  • Peanut Butter and Jelly
  • Salad Dressings / No Glass bottles
  • Rice, Microwavable
  • Meals, Microwavable

ENTERTAINMENT

  • Paperback Books and Magazines
  • Electronic Hand-held Games
  • Playing Cards
  • Yo-Yos
  • All-in-one Tools
  • Board Games
  • Duct Tape
  • Movies DVD, new or used
  • Crossword or Sudoko Puzzle Books
  • AAA, AA, C & D Batteries
  • Writing Materials

TOILETRIES

  • Feminine Hygiene Products
  • Hair Bands / Hair Clips
  • Nail Polish & Remover Wipes
  • Nail Clippers / Nail Files/Emory Boards
  • Q-Tips
  • Hair Spray (Pump)
  • Small Mirrors
  • Shampoo & Conditioner
  • Soap
  • Cotton Balls
  • Personal Hygiene Razors / Shaving Cream (Non Aerosol)
  • Deodorant
  • Toothbrushes / Toothpaste
  • Dental Floss
  • Eyeglass Lens Cleaner
  • Soap / Shampoo / Conditioner
  • Combs and Brushes
  • Lip Balm / Chapsticks
  • Sun Block
  • Clorox Wipes
  • Baby Wipes
  • Moisturizing Eyes Drops / Saline Nasal Spray
  • Hand Cream / Skin So Soft
  • Liquid Hand Sanitizer
  • Nail Files / Nail Clippers
  • Kleenex (travel size)
  • Eye Drops (for dry eyes)
  • Throat Lozenges / Cough Drops
  • Cooling Bananas / Neck Scarves
  • Hand Warmers
  • Breath Mints
  • Heavy Duty Socks

Please note that we will only be accepting dog food and treats that are made in the U.S.A.